1 · 1/23 · Introductions

in class

  • Overview
    • people
    • about the class
    • course structure
    • expectations
  • class website
    • people and portfolios
    • schedule
    • research
    • resources
      • tutorials
      • others resources
  • shop tour
  • revolutions
  • intro to Rhino
    • overview
    • interface
    • geometry types
    • 2D basics

homework

  • Readings
  • Tutorials
  • Exercises

2 · 1/30 · Rhino 2D Advanced

in class

  • dFab manual and shop policies
  • homework review
  • Rhino 2D intermediate
  • in-class exercise word tracing
    • generate 5 random words
    • pick your favorite and do a google image search (large) for that word plus “word”
    • find an appropriate example of an image of the word and download it
    • place it into your Rhino file using the “picture” command
    • scale it so that the letters are 2″ tall and add a rectangular border this a .5″ margin
    • trace the image using the variety of Rhinos curve creation and editing tools
    • repeat this process three times so that you have examples with text that is primarily:
      • linear
      • geometric
      • organic/script
    • save your file and an image or your drawings
  • preparing files for output
  • class website tutorial

homework


3 · 2/6 · Rhino 2D to 3D to 2D to Laser

in class

  • creating basic 3D geometry
  • unrolling 3D geometry to 2D
  • Laser Cutting
    • proper file prep
    • machine safety and operations

homework


4 · 2/13 · Project I Work Day

in class

  • Work on Project I
  • ad hoc demos

homework

  • Complete Project I

5 · 2/20 · Critique / Rhino 3D Intermediate

in class

  • Critique of Project I
  • Student Presentations

homework

  • Document work
  • update portfolio page
    • add Project I documentation
    • make sure all other work to date is present and complete
  • select a small object for our next exercise and project
  • acquire calipers and ruler if you have not done so already
  • read 3D printing tutorial

6 · 2/27 · 3D Printing

in class

  • Student Presentations
  • 3D printing Demo
  • Object Copy exercise
    • modeling strategies
    • measuring
    • accurate modeling
    • intermediate 2D to 3D

homework

  • complete object copy
  • print object copy
  • Exercises

7 · 3/5 · Project II Work Day

in class

  • student presentations
  • mini-crit of object copies
  • ad hoc Rhino demos
  • advanced 3D Printing
  • Project II – Physical-Digital Interplay
    For this project we will move and combine objects between physical and digital spaces. This project will begin with a physical object that you will faithfully recreate in Rhino. (Your object copy is intended to be the starting point here, but you may use another object if you choose.) You will then digitally manipulate that object somehow and 3D print it. You will then physically alter the 3D printed object. This may include surface treatments or other processes. Your sculpture must also include another physical object that is not digitally fabricated. This may be a found object or something you have made. This physical object must be incorporated into your sculpture with a precisely modeled and digitally fabricated connection. This connection can be printed or laser cut. It may be part of your copied and manipulated object or another element of the sculpture. You may include other components in your piece, but it must have these three elements: 1) copied, digitally altered, printed, physically altered object 2) a found or made physical object 3) digitally fabricated connection point for the physical object

homework

  • Finish Project II
  • Update your portfolio page – required for midterm grades

8 · 3/12 · Critique

in class

  • Project II Critique

homework

  • Readings
    • dFab CNC Manual
  • Tutorials
    • RhinoCAM tutorials
  • Exercises

9 · 3/19 · Spring Break


10 · 3/26 · Extended Break


11 · 4/2 · Reboot and Intro to Grasshopper

in class


homework

  • Make sure your portfolio page is complete and fully up to date.
  • Tutorials (you may choose to do the videos or the PDF tutorials, but it is recommended that you do both if possible)
  • Exercises
    • Play!
    • Explore the curve tools in Grasshopper, venturing out of that tab to the vectors, param, and beyond as needed.
    • Create 3 definitions in one file. One with a minimum of 5 unique components, another with 10, then 15.
    • Organize your definitions with tidy alignments, groups, labels
    • Create images of your definitions and the results in Rhino and upload all of your homework to your profile page.

12 · 4/9 · Grasshopper II

in class


homework


13 · 4/16 · GH data structures and 3D form

in class

  • Student Presentations
    • Raphael
    • Noah
    • Isabelle
  • Reading Discussion

homework


14 · 4/23 · Project III Work Day

in class


15 · 4/30 · Project III Work Day

in class

  • Student Presentations
    • Vinutha
    • Ziying
  • course evaluations
  • demo- creating Gcode
  • optional meetings

homework

  • Final Project – Grashopper to 3D print
    • Use the Final Project Template file with the slicer component (updated 5/4)
      • replace the sample geometry in this file with your own and reconnect as shown with the sample
    • Finalize your preliminary draft
      • be sure your geometry fits within the guidelines
      • avoid creating surfaces that are too horizontal
        • 45 degrees is a safe threshold
        • see fail example
    • Export your top curve to be used by a classmate
      • find the top edge of your geometry
        • if you used a loft, this will probably but be your highest input curve
        • otherwise, there are some optional components to help find your top curve
      • find the component titled “YourName’s Top Curve” and rename is with your name
      • connect the input that curve that matches your top edge into that renamed component
      • right-click this component and “internalise” the data
    • Get your new bottom curve
      • find the name of the student that precedes you in the spreadsheet
      • download their top curve from the same drive folder you save yours
      • open the file and copy that curve
      • paste the curve into your file
      • use this curve as your start curve (input for the “PTC” node) replacing the placeholder curve
    • Confirm new geometry
      • make sure that this change does not alter your top curve, otherwise you will break the chain of connection with your classmate’s piece
        • if it does, use the internalized geometry from your preliminary version to keep your top edge the same
      • make any modifications needed between the top and bottom curves to ensure your geometry still looks good and meets the requirements outlined above
    • Create Gcode using the Spiral Slicer component
      • connect your geometry to the “Geo” node on the Spiral Slicer
      • make sure that the BF from the Start Curve component is connected to the BF on the Spiral Slicer
      • make sure that the TF from the End Curve component is connected to the TF on the Spiral Slicer
      • right-click the file Path component and “select on new file location” to set the destination where your Gcode will be saved
        • choose the destination folder
        • set the filename to YourName_FinalProject_YYYY_MM_DD.gcode
      • set the toggle on S input to True
      • right-click on the Spiral Slicer component and enable it
        • this will probably take about 20 seconds to a minute to process
        • once complete you should see a visualization of the 3D printer paths
        • the msg output should tell you that your gcode file was saved
    • Upload your gcode file to the drive
    • Save and upload your .gh file to the drive
    • Sign up for a printing time slot
      • put the meeting time on your calendar and don’t miss it
    • Print your file
      • sign in to our usual class Zoom meeting at your scheduled time
      • work with Ryan to double check your file and send the print
      • check in on your print via the dedicated Zoom cam over the 2-3 hrs of print time
    • check the drive for a photo of your print
  • Create a rendering of your geometry in Rhino
    • baked GH geometry in Rhino
    • Render the geometry in Rhino to give the object a descriptive and luminous appearance
  • Upload all files and documentation to your portfolio page

16 · 5/7 · Final Critique

in class

  • Critique